In February, I starting using the WordPress plugin Blog2Social. All of my social media accounts connected with no problems except for Pinterest. For some reason, Pinterest absolutely would not accept the password I entered. I knew it was correct, because well, I’m not a good ruler follower, so all of my social media accounts have the same password. While attempting to log in on Pinterest, I got the following message:

I had no idea what I had violated because I never got the email mentioned. This also meant I had no idea on how to appeal. The phrase “get in touch with us” is quite difficult. Nowhere on Pinterest’s website is there a “Contact Us” link. A Google search gave me the link to the “Pinterest Help Center,” which consists of a whole bunch of articles with no one to talk to. At the bottom of the “Can’t log in to Pinterest” page, they ask “Still need help? Contact Us!” Finally, I get to speak to someone!

Nope. All I see is “Log in and we can help you better!” with a “Log into Pinterest” red button. Hello, I can’t log into my account it has been suspended! I screamed. Then I see a link in a much smaller font, “Continue without logging in.” Now I’m going to get speak to someone!

Nope. All I see is, “Help us get your message to the right person on our Community team.” There is a drop-down menu with the heading “What do you need help with?” I select, “Getting into my account.” And of course, there is another drop-down menu asking “Tell us more” and I select “Appeal account suspension.” They say a picture is worth a 1,000 words, here’s what I got next.

I clicked on the “I still need help” button. I filled out the form and submit it. Other than the confirmation email, I heard nothing from them. After a few days went by, I go back to Google in hopes of finding a telephone number for them. I find something called GetHuman, and again a picture is worth….

Not wanting to believe them that a company the size of Pinterest would not have a telephone number, I continued on with my search, and at some point, I did find a number. It soon became evident this number was a scam as the girl who answered told me, “For $79 Pinterest would reactivate my account.” Yea, I hung up.

Seeing there was no solution, I opened a new account with a different email. All of my followers were gone, all of my pins were gone, all of the time I had put into it was gone.

Finally five weeks later, I receive the following:

Pinterest - Big Max's Studio

No, he did not reactivate the account. The first image in this post was taken today. I’ve emailed them back letting them know the account was not reactivated, and have heard nothing. Further, when did pinning things such as images of logos, brochures, websites, etc. become spam? What exactly do they do if someone does report something as spam? Maybe a competitor wants to take you out, they just report you as spam and poof you are gone? Their policy seems a little “Lucy Goosey” to me.

As I said above, I lost everything I had put into Pinterest, but the worst part of the whole thing is I lost the URL to my website. In the old account my website had been verified, now when I try and verify it with the new account I get the following:

Pinterest - Big Max's Studio

And, I’m no longer bigmaxsstudio, I’m bigmaxsstudio0057. Could I not at least be bigmaxsstudio007?

When you actually do hear from Pinterest the email address is help@pinterest.zendesk.com. Really?! A company the size of Pinterest, that wants people to pay to boost posts works through Zendesk? Really?!

So in the end, yes I am cautious about diving into Pinterest again. At this point, I can only hope for a better outcome. I must say though, I really would like to have my name and website back.

I know I’m not the only one to have had this happen to them, actually from everything I’ve seen on Google, it’s quite common.

Do you have a nightmare Pinterest story?

I’d love to hear it. Let’s chat.

I am an awarding winning logo and website designer who when not designing logos and websites, likes to write about how the industry has changed and what it looks to become in the future. I started designing websites around 1995. For the past 8 years, all sites have been developed in WordPress. Originally, I would develop the site in HTML and then convert those files to WordPress. Today all child themes are built on the framework of Divi. Guest blogger at 3lovablelabs,  Tropic Moon Media, and Patti & Hank.

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